Monthly Archives: September 2015

Final Contact Updates

The following email went out to club officers on file with the FRU –

Please take a look at the contact list below and confirm your club contacts are correct. We will be implementing the rain and emergency field closure policy this fall, part of this policy includes calling the president and match secretary on file with the union if you need to cancel. If this information is incorrect, please update it at using the link on this page by 9/27, do not reply to this email with your information. – https://floridarugbyunion.org/contacts/

Rain and Emergency Field Closure Policy – https://floridarugbyunion.org/handbook/

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Cam Dolan Makes Southwest Florida, and his Dad, Proud.

By Stephen Sheehan

Cam Dolan threw a 45-yard touchdown strike on his first play of freshman football at Palmetto Ridge High School. Eight games later, his team was undefeated and parents and friends told his father Terrey that Cam could end up playing for the Florida Gators.

Cam never played football again.

The Naples native whose sweet swing warranted neighborhood cheers and whose dominance with the puck made him one frightening 4-year-old in an eight-and-under roller hockey league went down a different path than most American kids.

He tried rugby.

Cam Dolan - USA Rugby
Cam Dolan – USA Rugby

While his father Terrey had no prior experience in the sport, he did play tennis while attending the University of South Florida and was a former nationally ranked high-jumper in high school. Given his athletic genes, Cam seemingly had all the physical tools to grow into an elite rugby player. After all, this is the kid whose elementary school PE teacher entered him into the Southwest Florida bracket of the Punt, Pass & Kick competition, which Cam won, of course.

As Terrey put it, “Cam basically came out of the womb growling and swinging.”

Though he probably could have been a great football player, Cam decided to take his athletic talents to the rugby pitch for Steve Young’s Naples Bears. Having already won four high-school club championships, Young was well-established as one of the best high school coaches in the state and Dolan became an instant sensation. Six weeks into his rugby career, he was called up to play for the national U-17 team.

Of course, the game was all new to Terrey, who literally went out and bought a copy of Rugby for Dummies in order to learn the ins and outs of his son’s new passion.

While playing for the U-17 team over in England, Cam’s play drew the attention of hundreds of spectators and even more colleges and universities.

“I had never even personally see him play a rugby game,” his father recalled. “When he got home from that tournament my phone was ringing off the hook from English schools wanting him to come play for them.”

Cam did end up playing in England during the fall of his senior year before returning to the U.S. to finish up high school. However, it didn’t take long before the rugby suitors started calling.

One of those schools was Life University, a private school located in Marietta, Ga. that’s produced several national team stars like Phil Thiel and AJ MacGinty. Cam earned a rare full-ride scholarship to the prestigious rugby powerhouse and went on to become a four-time All-American and national champion for the Running Eagles.

A versatile athlete who also made appearances for the U.S. National Sevens team back in 2011, Cam set his sights on becoming a staple of the U.S. Eagles, the national 15s team.

In only a few years since graduating from Life, Cam has gone from a Florida youth sport star to a bonafide professional rugby player. His size, speed and outstanding collegiate career helped him earn a contract with the renowned Northampton Saints, a professional rugby club based in England. Though Cam’s experience could have gone better, getting through adversity is nothing new. According to Terrey, Cam suffered two torn ACLs during his athletic career, but he’s surprisingly returned faster than ever after both injuries.

Following his stop in Northampton, Cam has since signed a contract with the Cardiff Blues, where he’s expected to earn more playing time while playing a system that’s better suited to his freakish athleticism.

All of the moving around the world has taken its toll on Cam’s family. Terrey, who works as the Director of Planning for Lennar Homes’ Southwest Florida Division, has only been able to see him play in person for a national side a handful of times. That doesn’t mean he’s any less of a fan, as his humble son often has to remind his dad to keep the cheerleading to a minimum.

Even with the pro contract and accolades that come with being a world-renowned athlete, representing his country and giving back to the community is something else entirely worthwhile for Cam.

“It’s not even how great of an athlete he’s fortunate enough to be,” his father said. “He can make friends with the devil’s meaner, older brother. He’s just a humble guy who doesn’t seek the spotlight.”

Avoiding the spotlight is a challenge for a guy who stands 6-foot-6, especially given his prominent spot on the Eagles. Capable of playing loose forward or second row, Cam has settled in as a lock forward for an Eagles team that suffered a critical loss at the spot when veteran Scott LaValla was ruled out for the 2015 Rugby World Cup due to an elbow injury.

Cam Dolan - USA Rugby Lineout
Cam Dolan – USA Rugby Lineout

While the Eagles face an uphill battle against a tough pool that includes South Africa, Samoa, Scotland and Japan, they have a ton of new blood that could help them score some upsets over in England.

“There may not be more professional players than the 2011 team, but the quality of the athletes overall has greatly increased,” said Terrey.

At the end of the day, whether the Eagles go 4-0 or 0-4, the fact that young home-grown stars like Cam Dolan, Seamus Kelly and Danny Barrett are coming into their own is a fantastic step in the right direction for the growth of rugby in the U.S. This generation of talent will only set the stage for future generations to come through the youth system like Cam, who has clearly made an impact on the youth around the world already.

“While he was with Northampton doing community service work I received personal text messages from parents of disabled kids thanking me for how my son went above and beyond speaking with their children,” Terrey said. “After that I said he would never have to play another minute of rugby for the rest of my life and I’ll be proud.”

Luckily for American rugby fans, we’ll get to see plenty of Cam donning the U.S. colors for a while.

Weetabix - The official Breakfast Cereal of USA Rugby Featuring Cam Dolan.
Weetabix The official Breakfast Cereal of USA Rugby image featuring Cam Dolan

$40 pre-registration extended to on-site registrants for Summit Saturday

The $40 early registration fee will be in effect for on-site registrants for the Summit Saturday to encourage our current coaches to take this opportunity for PDCs and to remain active.

Certified coaches are responsible for annually maintaining their active coaching status with USAR. Every team requires an active coach in order to be considered in compliance and compete in the FRU. Non-compliant teams will not be assigned referees. You can maintain “active” status by annually completing 10 Professional Development Credits (PDCs). The FRU has made this easy for its’ coaches by offering an annual Development Summit. On Saturday, we offer an afternoon session to acquire 10 PDCs, including information on Rugby Strength and Conditioning by Matt Mallard and Continuity of Play by Paul Vercoe from USA Rugby. These are the only PDCs we will be offering in Florida for the year, and is only the second year we have hosted this summit and offered PDC units through the FRU’s administration. On Sunday we offer Level 200 coach certification. Please see this page for more details and to register:

https://floridarugbyunion.org/floridasummit/

Reminder – Professional Development Credits needed for Coaching Status

This is a reminder that certified coaches are responsible for annually maintaining their “active” coaching status. Every team requires an active coach in order to be considered in compliance and compete in the FRU. You can maintain “active” status by annually completing 10 Professional Development Credits (PDCs). The FRU has made this easy for its’ coaches by offering an annual Development Summit. On Saturday, we offer an afternoon session to acquire 10 PDCs, including information on Rugby Strength and Conditioning by Matt Mallard and Continuity of Play by Paul Vercoe from USA Rugby. This is the only PDCs we will be offering in Florida for the year, and is only the second year we have hosted this summit. On Sunday we offer Level 200 coach certification. Please see this page for more details and to register:

https://floridarugbyunion.org/floridasummit/

Last day to register for Level 200 clinic on 9/13 – no fall play will be allowed for clubs without a Level 200 coach

If you intend on attending the USA Rugby Level 200 Coaching Course on September 13th in Sebastian River you will need to register online by end of business today. You can register by clicking here. USA Rugby need to finalize their logistics on this course ASAP. Please do not delay registering, if you are having issues getting your registration completed please contact USA Rugby by emailing Kelly Sullivan at ksullivan@usarugby.org. If your club does not have a Level 200 certified coach, you will not be allowed to play in any matches and no referees will be assigned to your club, because you will not be compliant with USAR and thus your club will not have liability insurance.
Lastly, we have the coach education summit on Saturday September 12th, please see the details bellow on the course. We would like to coaches and administrators to pre-register for the course if possible. Please contact us should have any questions on this at all.